Verizon Cloud Fiasco

On Jan. 10, 2015, Verizon will take its new cloud service, Verizon Cloud, down for two days.

That’s not a typo. They’re not taking it down for two hours. They’re taking it down for two days. What the… !

VerizonCloudDown

When Verizon said they’re taking it down, they’re not kidding. You won’t be able to access any cloud services or data. The company is telling customers to shut down their virtual machines (VM) an hour before the official shutdown. After that your VMs, object stores, the Verizon Cloud Console and the API will all be offline.

What a service!

As Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, told Computerworld: “Honestly, [users] should threaten to pull their business. If this looks like it will be a recurring problem, I’d recommend changing vendors. In today’s world, there should be no legitimate reason for a shutdown this long if the service is set up correctly.”

Why is Verizon doing this? Darned if I know. Verizon isn’t talking.

It’s no secret that clouds go down. From Amazon to Zettagrid, they all go down sometimes.

What doesn’t usually happen is for an entire cloud service to go down. After all, that’s why the major public and biggest private cloud services use Availability Zones (AZ). With AZs even if one cloud data center is hit by a meteorite, the rest of the data centers should be able to pick up the load.

Verizon Cloud, however, simply doesn’t seem to have the scalability to deal with even a planned outage. This is unacceptable.

As David S. Linthicum, SVP at Cloud Technology Partners, wrote, “I never expect 100 percent uptime, planned outages aren’t needed if the cloud platforms are designed correctly. It’s quite possible to do live migrations without a server reset these days.”

Exactly so. It’s 2015. I can do, and I’ve done, live-server migrations with Linux KVM and Windows Server 2012 myself. This is not rocket science.

I mean, seriously, one of the cloud’s big selling points is that you don’t have to worry about downtime. Sure, we know we’ll still see hiccups, but we pay for clouds so that our business never goes offline.

If a cloud provider can’t deliver at least 99%, you shouldn’t be using them. Indeed, as CloudHarmony, which tracks cloud and net services uptime, shows cloud reliability is getting good enough where it’s not unreasonable to ask cloud providers for Six Sigma (99.99966%) uptime guarantees. That’s about a minute of downtime in a year.

This isn’t fiction. This is the high end of the state of the art for the cloud in 2015. It is utterly unacceptable for Verizon, or any other cloud service, to provide corporate customers with scheduled downtimes that’s measured in days.

Trackbacks

  1. […] the same time, Verizon alienated customers by closing the service for 48-hours with little notice, in January 2015. Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, spoke for many when he said, […]

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  2. […] the same time, Verizon alienated customers by closing the service for 48-hours with little notice, in January 2015. Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, spoke for many when he said, […]

    Like

  3. […] the same time, Verizon alienated customers by closing the service for 48-hours with little notice, in January 2015. Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, spoke for many when he said, […]

    Like

  4. […] the same time, Verizon alienated customers by closing the service for 48-hours with little notice, in January 2015. Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group, spoke for many when he said, […]

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